Leaked photos show new U.S. Army super cannon in stunning detail – Defence Blog

Leaked photos show new U.S. Army super cannon in stunning detail – Defence Blog


New leaked photos are giving military experts and analysts a first detailed look at the advanced U.S. Army 155mm self-propelled howitzer that equipped with huge XM907 58 caliber cannon.

A Twitter user 笑脸男人 has posted some new photos of Army’s next-generation self-propelled howitzer prototype, currently known as XM1299

The new 155mm self-propelled howitzer is developed under Extended Range Cannon Artillery, or ERCA, project and is funded by Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center’s science and technology office.

The U.S. Army’s extended-range artillery system designed to increase the range and rate of fire on current and future M109A7 self-propelled howitzers. Compared to its predecessors, a new artillery system will receive two leading-edge technology – new XM1113 rocket-boosted shell and a longer howitzer 58 caliber cannon increases range from 38km to 70km+.

The new artillery system will be designated as M1299.

The Army hopes that with enhanced ammunition those super cannons could reach targets at 100 km. For these system develops not only the XM907 cannon but also products, such as the XM1113 rocket assisted projectile, the XM654 supercharge, an autoloader, and new fire control system.

Building on mobility upgrades, M1299 will increase the lethality of self-propelled howitzers. New SPH provides a “10x” capability through a combination of an increased range, increased rate of fire, increased lethality, increased reliability and greater survivability.

M1299 will provide integrated cannon artillery technology solutions to maximize performance at a system level and regain lethality overmatch for U.S. Army 155mm indirect fire systems for operations in emerging battlespaces and near/peer environments.

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